May 25, 2018

LATIN LESSONS: Per Se

The Latin term “per se” peppers many conversations though it is often used incorrectly.

The literal translation of per se is “by itself”; however, many Americans use it as a synonym for “quite” and “exactly”.  The phrase is so misused that it has won an entry in Urban Dictionary.  When utilized correctly the phrase pinpoints a single element of a larger thing, e.g., I didn’t enjoy the movie per se, but the cinematography was … Read more

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May 18, 2018

LATIN LESSONS: Et Al., Etc. and Inter Alia

The terms “et al.”, “etc.” and “inter alia” are similar, though different in meaning.

Et al. is an abbreviation for et alia (neutral), et alii (masculine) or et aliae (feminine).  When translated from Latin, it means “and others”. Etc. is an abbreviation for et cetera (commonly written without the space in English), translated from Latin as “and the rest”.  The literal Latin translation for inter alia is “among other things”.

Et al. is used at … Read more

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May 17, 2018

Introducing Phillip Jones as Our New Associate Attorney

Phillip D. Jones, Associate AttorneyWe are thrilled to announce that Phillip Jones has joined our team as an Associate Attorney.

Phil is a native Oregonian.  He earned his law degree from Willamette University College of Law in 2015 and graduated from the University of Oregon with a BA in Political Science in 2009.

Phil was admitted to the Oregon Bar in 2015. He has handled all types of family law matters and has also successfully tried criminal cases.  He … Read more

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LEGAL ASSISTANT’S CORNER: We Do Know What We Know

One of the readers of my previous article commented: “While I don’t know everything, I do know what I know.” Despite my admission that legal assistants don’t know everything related to law, there are circumstances in which we do know everything.

Legal assistants are the detailers of the legal profession. We make the attorney’s vision of their solution to a client’s problem come to fruition. We get ‘er done.

Many attorneys only understand their part … Read more

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May 1, 2018

LATIN LESSONS: Habeas Corpus

A Latin legal term that pops up in headlines fairly frequently is “habeas corpus”.

Habeas corpus is a legal procedure to keep the government from indefinitely detaining someone without showing cause.  The literal Latin translation for habeas corpus is you shall have the body.

Any person can petition the court to issue a writ of habeas corpus ordering the detainer to present the detainee in court along with proof justifying why the detainee should continue … Read more

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Apr 24, 2018

LEGAL ASSISTANT’S CORNER: We Don’t Know It All

I work in a small general practice law firm.  Despite that description, I am not familiar with every area of law.  There are dozens of areas of law, some broad in scope and others very specific.  Some law firms opt to practice in limited areas of law while others, like the one I work in, practice in several areas of law.  There are benefits and drawbacks to each law firm model; however, I prefer working … Read more

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Apr 17, 2018

Drum Roll, Please!

Today, April 17, is National Haiku Day – let us all break out our pencils and pay homage to the Japanese art form!  Without further ado, here is mine (with tongue solidly in cheek):

Snakes, spiders, rats, wolves

Slither, creepy, dirty, sly

The den of lawyers

Don’t worry, I plan on sticking to my day job.

© 4/17/2018 Heather M. Carr of Hunt & Associates, P.C.  All rights reserved.… Read more

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LATIN LESSONS: Pro Se and Pro Per

You may have heard the Latin terms “pro se” and/or “pro per” tossed about when discussing who someone is legally represented by.

Pro se is a term utilized in the court system to refer to someone who has opted to represent himself.  Translated from Latin it means on one’s own behalf.  Pro per is used in the courtroom interchangeably with pro se and is an abbreviation for the Latin term “in propria persona” which means … Read more

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Apr 13, 2018

Prohibition, Booze Cruises and “Preppers”

DID YOU KNOW?

During Prohibition, it was still absolutely legal to consume alcohol; it was only illegal to manufacture, sell or transport “intoxicating liquors” according to the 18th Amendment which was passed in January 1919. The amendment didn’t go into effect until January 1920 so early American “preppers” could stockpile their liquor(s) of choice. The entire debacle came to a close with the 21st Amendment on December 5, 1933 but not before some … Read more

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Apr 5, 2018

LATIN LESSONS: Subpoena and Subpoena Duces Tecum

The legal world still hangs on tight to their archaic Latin terms and some terms have even become part of our modern lexicon such as “subpoena” and “subpoena duces tecum”.

A subpoena is a writ ordering someone to attend a court proceeding. The word subpoena originated in Latin as “sub poena” which means under penalty – words still utilized in subpoenas issued today.

A subpoena duces tecum is a writ ordering someone to attend a … Read more

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